[Freedom-misc] Need help choosing a free licence for my website

mason at masonhock.com mason at masonhock.com
Sun Jan 20 21:38:13 CET 2019


How is this,

 > Of course, the "consumer" of the work may be as well a "producer" who could  
build upon that work. That is true for all works, functional or not.  
Repeatedly pointing out that to defend the free culture movement basically  
amounts to recognizing that this movement is about giving freedoms to  
authors; that modifying artistic works is not an essential right the public  
is morally entitled to.

a fundamentally different argument from this?

Of course, the "user" of the work may be as well a "developer" who could  
build upon that work. That is true for all works, functional or not.  
Repeatedly pointing out that to defend the free software movement basically  
amounts to recognizing that this movement is about giving freedoms to  
developers; that modifying software is not an essential right the public is  
morally entitled to.

(My apologies for exercising freedom 3.)

 >  If that time helps the original author live off her work and,  
consequently, produce more (that hypothesis could be scientifically tested),  
then having those additional works produced is worth the lateness of  
derivative works. Since, in practice, for almost all cultural/opinionated  
works, financial gains are only made during a few years after the  
publication, having a copyright exceeding that is detrimental. And, after the  
death of the author, copyrights to "right holders" make absolute no sense to  
me.

This part I agree with. I am not necessarily opposed to a few years of  
copyrestrictions if it can be proven that a total lack of restrictions would  
impact the creation of new works, but the way to prove it is to gradually  
decrease the both the duration and nature (I suspect that a non-commercial  
monopoly would be sufficient) until it starts to harm the public and then  
back off. This should be done independently for different media, since the  
appropriate compromise could be different for each. I think this applies to  
software too, not just art and entertainment, since the creation of new  
software can be just as beneficial to the public, but I suspect that the  
minimum restrictions needed for software will be very brief and limited,  
possibly zero years, because there is so much popular free software.


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